Sustainable agriculture is Africa's best answer to poverty

Agricultural Development

JAM has identified agricultural development as one of the highest priorities for long-term sustainable development, as we realise our vision of Helping Africa Help Itself. The implementation of agricultural programmes differ from country to country, and is dependent on the context, geography, community perceptions and stage of development in a particular region or country.

In Mozambique, which is ripe for agricultural development, JAM has established a Homegrown School Feeding Programme at our Pambarra base. Through this exciting development, JAM is growing the food needed for school meals and is training local community farmers to produce more crops. JAM drives the establishment of school gardens to provide students with the knowledge and training to improve their family's small crop yields. Eventually, we believe these students will become flourishing farmers helping to improve local food security once they have completed their schooling.

In South Sudan, agricultural development is a means to improve community cohesion, and development through a series of interventions. In South Africa, JAM works in conjunction with the Gauteng Department of Agriculture to provide community farmers with training and inputs to improve existing practices and generate household income.

There are currently 78 active agricultural projects

Programme Objectives

Improve Food Security

Improve Food Security

Build Home-Grown School Feeding

Build Home-Grown School Feeding

Engage Communities

Engage Communities

JAM's Agricultural Development Programme in Mozambique is centred at JAM's Pambarra Life Centre (PLC) Farm. At the farm, we are through our pioneering HGSF programme, JAM is producing the ingredients needed for its proven super cereal, a fortified Corn, Soya Blended (CSB) dry porridge to feed 6,000 children initially, but with plans for expansion. Additional projects being implemented at the farm include fish farming to improve local communities access to a source of protein; farmer training, school garden renovations and aiding neighbouring farmers in improving irrigation techniques. The groundbreaking work being accomplished at the farm is JAM’s answer to a common donor question: "Will we be feeding these children forever or will we develop them so one day they can feed themselves?” To achieve the sustainability of these projects, the farm also generates an income from the sale of vegetables, crops, and seedlings to local businesses.

JAM works with WFP (World Food Programme) in South Sudan to develop agricultural capacity through FFA (Food For Asset) programmes across 3 states (Lakes, Northern Bar Gazhal, Warrap.) Through these programmes, in 2014, 60 community fields have been cleared, prepared, planted and harvested; 16 additional small community gardens were established and 1 pond was built.

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